Types of Interpreting

Conference interpreting – the provision of interpreting services at multi-lingual meetings involving people speaking in different tongues. Conference interpreting is mostly conducted in the simultaneous mode.

Community interpreting – a blanket term to refer to interpreting services provided in different settings in the community, as opposed to the provision of interpreting services at multilingual international conferences, also known as liaison interpreting, public service interpreting and dialogue interpreting. Community interpreting is usually conducted in the consecutive mode, though SI (usually chuchotage) and Sight Translation are sometimes used.

 

Subsets of community interpreting

Community interpreting can be further divided into different subsets depending on the settings in which interpreting services are provided. The two major subsets of community interpreting are:

Medical interpreting – interpreting services provided in healthcare settings, for example, at medical consultations or examinations where the medical personnel and the patient do not speak the same language.

Legal interpreting  interpreting services provided in legal settings such as courts, police stations, law firms and immigration offices.

 

ENDORSEMENTS

This is indeed a resourceful website not just for interpreting students but also for researchers who are interested in interpreting studies.

Read More

Dr Ester Leung,
Associate Professor, Translation Programme, Hong Kong Baptist University

Resources for Interpreting is the product of years of experience and expertise.  It is useful not only to professionals, but also researchers and all students of Chinese and English...

Read More

Professor Keith McMahon, University of Kansas

I am happy to endorse her website with the greatest praise for her efforts. This glossary will be useful to interpreting students from far and wide, and its usefulness will extend well across the borders of Hong Kong...

Read More

Dr Ineke Crezee, Auckland University of Technology

© 2017 School of Chinese, the University of Hong Kong. All rights reserved. free hit counters